Skip to content

November 12, 2013

Ethics Bowl team wins regional competition

Congratulations to the Taylor University Ethics Bowl team. This past Saturday, November 9, the they won the regional championship for the second consecutive year and for the 3rd time in the last four years. This qualifies Taylor to compete in the national Ethics Bowl competition which is scheduled for February 27, 2014 and will be held at the Hyatt Regency Riverfront Hotel in Jacksonville, Florida. Taylor University will be one of 32 schools in the national competition with each school allowed to enter just one team. Taylor University entered three teams in the regional competition and placed first, third and fifth. Our teams had a combined record of 8 wins and 1 loss.

Twenty teams participated in this year’s Central States Regional competition. The other schools involved were Bellarmine University, Belmont University (two teams), Butler University, College of Mount St. Joseph (two teams) DePauw University (two teams), Eastern Kentucky University, Illinois Wesleyan University (two teams), Indiana University, Ivy Tech Community College, Marian University, Northern Kentucky University, University of Louisville, and Xavier University.

The members of the Taylor University Ethics Bowl team who competed were:
Team 1:
Suzanne Neefus (Senior, Philosophy)
Stephen Weick (Junior, Philosophy/History)
Joe Kasper (Junior, Chemistry/Math)
Blair Hedges (Freshman, Political Science)

Team 2 (first pace in the regional competition):
Nathaniel Cullen (Junior, Philosophy/Env. Studies)
Kyle Carruthers (Junior, Philosophy/Pro Writing)
Davis Meadors (Junior, Biblical Literature/Philosophy)
Lydia Grace Espiritu (Sophomore, Philosophy)

Team 3:
Jess Biermann (Junior, Philosophy)
Kasey Leander (Sophomore, History/Political Science)
Mark Taylor (Junior, Philosophy/Biblical Literature)
Veronica Toth (Sophomore, English Literature)

The cases debated at this year’s competition were excruciating as always, including the following:
Should bone marrow extraction and transplantation continue to be governed by the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984?
Should a particular business owner disclose his employees’ salaries when giving them the rationale for his company’s budget cuts?
If autonomous (computer-guided, self-driving) cars become standardized, should humans be forbidden by law to drive?
Do American consumers have a moral duty to find alternatives to clothing produced in sweat shops?
Other cases pertained to issues as wide ranging as surrogate motherhood, animal welfare issues, and child obesity public service commercials.

Read more from Center for Ethics News

Leave a comment

Note: HTML is allowed. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to comments

required
required